Radio Interview: By Any Means Necessary

Screen Shot 2019-04-25 at 5.19.59 PMIn a special segment of “By Any Means Necessary” Eugene Puryear and Sean Blackmon are joined by author Jenny Brown to talk about her new book “Birth Strike: The Hidden Fight over Women’s Work” now available from PM Press, the perverse motives behind anti-abortion and anti-birth control legislation and campaigns, the exploitation of motherhood by capitalism, what an organized birth strike could look like, and the intersection of white supremacy, male supremacy and birth policy.

Listen here:

https://www.spreaker.com/user/radiosputnik/book-review-birth-strike-the-hidden-figh

Not in Labor (Jacobin)

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Women’s March, NYC, January 2019. Photo: Jenny Brown

“In 2017, the birth rate in the United States reached an all-time low. In her new book Birth Strike: The Hidden Fight Over Women’s Work (PM Press), activist and author Jenny Brown argues that declining birth rates represent a work slowdown, or strike, in the face of the poor conditions for those who do the labor of bearing and raising children.

“Like many of the classic texts of the Second Wave feminist movement, Brown’s book is her own, yet also a collective, intellectual endeavor, growing out of her organizing work with Redstockings and National Women’s Liberation, including those groups’ discussions and consciousness raising sessions.

“Jacobin’s Liza Featherstone spoke with Jenny Brown about the book at New York City’s Strand bookstore earlier this month.

Full article here: https://jacobinmag.com/2019/04/birth-strike-jenny-brown-interview

 

Q & A with Fatherly about Birth Strike

“The US birth rate is at its lowest point in three decades and sliding. The population shrinks daily even as the private sector struggles with a labor shortage and politicians promised GDP growth incompatible with a contracting workforce. Though they rarely get credit for it, parents grow the economy by raising the kids who wind up participating in it. When adults opt out of parentworkingmillenialcouple-headerhood en masse — there’s a fine example of this in Japan — economies sputter and stall. So it behooves both policymakers and private sector leaders to consider why Americans in prime child-bearing years are opting out of procreation. And it turns out there are some concrete and fairly obvious answers.”

See the rest at:

https://www.fatherly.com/love-money/us-birth-rate-decline-economics-of-parenting/